How Working with Nonprofits is Beneficial for Design Engineers (or Professional Services Firms)

   It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed.” - Napoleon Hill

Choosing any professional for a job is never easy. Most people don't know exactly what design engineers do, and they certainly don't know how to judge how competent they are.

But your potential clients might one day need the services of an A/E firm (don't leave out professional services firms) and wonder how they'll be able to choose the best one. While experience and skill in the industry are understandably important, not being deliberate enough in this selection process can have serious ramifications.

Maybe a business chooses an A/E firm based on a recommendation, but there's no innovation or creativity. Or a selected design engineer lacks dedication to the project, leaving the client wishing they could ditch the contract for someone else.

     How can a potential client see into the heart and mind of a design engineer professional whose work is done largely behind the scenes?

These are difficult scenarios, but not uncommon. How can a potential client see into the heart and mind of a design engineer professional whose work is done largely behind the scenes?

While past projects are one way to accomplish this, so is the right kind of work with nonprofits.

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What to Expect from a Florida Tax Audit

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The day your business receives a DR-840 notice from the Florida Department of Revenue will be one that you won't soon forget. This is the state's infamous Notice of Intent to Audit Books and Records. Your first action might be to crumble up the notice, toss it on the floor, and yell, "Why me?" This might feel good, but it's not going to prevent the state from auditing your business.

So, what can you expect in the wake of receiving one of these notices? The state's revenue office has tried to help clear up any confusion and ease your mind by publishing its own outline of its auditing process. It promises that this is not going to be a frustrating or time-consuming experience. The truth is that you might find the road ahead both frustrating and time-consuming, particularly if you try to navigate this process without help.

Why You Need Florida Tax Audit Services

The notice of a tax audit can be intimidating at best and lead to expensive consequences in a worst-case scenario. Few business owners are entirely familiar with the tax law and the way that the audit process works. Similar to a legal proceeding, an auditor might try to get you to admit wrongdoing or provide information that they are not entitled to.

Attempting to handle a business tax audit without representation can be more costly than getting the help you need. There are penalties and fees that could be accrued if you don't have the right person as an advisor and advocate.

The best course of action is to have an experienced accounting professional in your corner that specializes in tax auditing and working with government entities. This can save your company time, frustration, and expense in the short and long-term. Even so, it helps to have an understanding of how a Florida tax audit works.

Notification of a Florida Tax Audit

The notification of a business tax audit in Florida will always come in the mail by way of a form DR-840. If you receive a phone call warning of an audit, it is a telemarketing scam. One of those forms, however, is the real deal and something that you'll need to take seriously.

The DR-840 will outline some pertinent information about your audit. This includes the taxes being audited, the timeline for the audit, and any relevant statute. There is also usually a request for information from your company.

You might wonder how you've been singled out for this attention from the Department of Revenue, and there are several possibilities. The department chooses its candidates for tax audits in a variety of ways. These include:

  • Information from the IRS
  • Information from other state agencies or other states
  • Department of Revenue database information
  • Business directories, publications, and journals
  • Computer-based random selection
  • Tips from other taxpayers

The reasons for these audits vary, but most occur because there is a suspicion of non-compliance of the state's tax code. Not everyone owes taxes at the end of a state audit, but this is commonly the case after a thorough review of business records.

What Happens During a Florida Tax Audit?

How your audit proceeds will depend on what type of audit the state orders. There are two possibilities - a Desk Audit and a Field Audit. A desk audit requires that you meet with the state's auditor in one of the local Department of Revenue offices. A field audit will take place at your business location.

Whichever type of audit the DOR demands, the agency can't force you to begin the process or turn information over in less than 60 days. This is according to state law. The agency might ask you to meet with them sooner, but you would be waiving your rights to that 60-day preparation period if you agreed.

The types of records that the auditor will want to review may include:

  • Federal income tax returns
  • State tax returns
  • General ledgers and journals
  • Depreciation schedules
  • Property records
  • Sales and purchase journals
  • Resale certificates or a sales tax exemption
  • Documentation that verifies figures on tax returns

The DOR can audit a business for a period of three years, or a longer period if you didn't file tax returns or filed returns that were substantially incorrect. If you cannot produce the required records, the auditor will estimate your tax liability based on the information that is available.

You have the right to know any basic findings or proposed changes as the audit proceeds. Once it is complete, you will receive a notice that contains the final findings. If you don't agree with them, you have just 30 days to notify the auditor of your disagreement. If you owe money, you will need to pay this immediately or make arrangements for a payment plan.

Florida Business Tax Audit Representation

While a tax auditor might appear to be helpful and even offer some suggestions, it would be a mistake to look at these officials as your friends. They aren't. For example, it's never a good idea to an invite an auditor to your workplace when this isn't a requirement. Also, avoid signing release forms or giving auditors access to electronic records, which could give them information that falls beyond the scope of the audit.

A Florida tax audit can range from a minor inconvenience to something that has grave consequences. In some cases, these auditors can ask for extensive and unnecessary documentation that opens even more doors for questions. If the officials decide that you violated Florida tax law, the penalties can include hefty fines and even jail time in some cases.

While this process might seem daunting, a knowledgeable tax professional can help you navigate and survive a tax audit in the best way possible.

If you have received one of these notices or would like to speak with an accountant about your situation, contact us now to learn how we can help.

 

Lewis Hunter
ABOUT THE AUTHOR | Lewis Hunter
Lewis founded Hunter & Associates in 1990 to help small-business owners achieve their potential. He manages the firm’s client relationships, regularly soliciting assessments of our team’s progress and seeking feedback on our performance and value-added services. He is an expert in cost accounting, overhead rate management and transition planning for architecture and engineering firms. Lewis also manages or performs all examinations of overhead rates that are reported to state transportation departments, including indirect cost rate audits for firms qualified as disadvantaged business enterprises (DBEs). He has managed the attestation services for applicants seeking reimbursement from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection for costs incurred in remediation of petroleum contamination of underground storage tanks as well.
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